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XaNovel-Featured_Book_FlatCo-written by Malcolm X’s daughter, this riveting and revealing novel follows the formative years of the man whose words and actions shook the world.    <–read more–>

“Powerful and charming—makes you see things in a whole new way. One of the best books I’ve read in quite some time.”

Chris Rock


I love your site my sister.Will you be in atlanta this weekend to celebrate your Fathers birthday.You signed my book in TUSKEGEE.I was the brother with the kufee on my head and the big ankh.Forgive me for my bad spelling.Hotep,Norman a.k.a Umaara. ... See MoreSee Less

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ILYASAH SHABAZZ added 10 new photos. ... See MoreSee Less

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You couldn't possibly understand the depth of respect and brotherly love I have for your father who, unfortunately, I never had the honor to even meet in person. He made a great impact on my life from the early age of 10yrs., as a child growing up in the ghetto of South Central Los Angeles. As I followed him over the short years before his death he inspired the strife for truth within me that has driven me throughout my life, and brought me to a much greater level of spiritual understanding. May Allah (swa) bless his soul, you and all his off-spring, and may his spirit continue to live on in the hearts and minds of mankind... AsSalaamu Alaikum!!! ... See MoreSee Less

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Hi everyone i go by the name of Assane dione, i am 22 and i live in senegal from west Africa seen that Malcolm x is not know as it could be in my country i have decided to set up a movement which main goal is to highlight thé life and work of this great man who has given his life to protect black people and for that i need your helps,contributions and advices..thank for your understanding.... ... See MoreSee Less

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Good morning Sister SHABAZZ. Just from one heart to another. Your family is loved, by God first, then me.(as so many others feel)Have a beautiful week and may God continue to feel welcomed to bless you and all you love. ... See MoreSee Less

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Honoring legendary Malcolm X, An American Hero. Video: The House Negro And The Field Negro Speech. ... See MoreSee Less

Honoring legendary Malcolm X, An American Hero who was murdered on this day 51 years ago. (May 19, 1925 -- February 21, 1965) Born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, Malcolm X was a human rights activist and so much more... Subscribe to I Love Ancestry eNews: eepurl.com/CLJan "Back during slavery, when Black people like me talked to the slaves, they didn't kill 'em, they sent some old house Negro along behind him to undo what he said. You have to read the history of slavery to understand this. There were two kinds of Negroes. There was that old house Negro and the field Negro. And the house Negro always looked out for his master. When the field Negroes got too much out of line, he held them back in check. He put 'em back on the plantation. The house Negro could afford to do that because he lived better than the field Negro. He ate better, he dressed better, and he lived in a better house. He lived right up next to his master - in the attic or the basement. He ate the same food his master ate and wore his same clothes. And he could talk just like his master - good diction. And he loved his master more than his master loved himself. That's why he didn't want his master hurt. If the master got sick, he'd say, "What's the matter, boss, we sick?" When the master's house caught afire, he'd try and put the fire out. He didn't want his master's house burned. He never wanted his master's property threatened. And he was more defensive of it than the master was. That was the house Negro. But then you had some field Negroes, who lived in huts, had nothing to lose. They wore the worst kind of clothes. They ate the worst food. And they caught hell. They felt the sting of the lash. They hated their master. Oh yes, they did. If the master got sick, they'd pray that the master died. If the master's house caught afire, they'd pray for a strong wind to come along. This was the difference between the two. And today you still have house Negroes and field Negroes. I'm a field Negro." ~Malcolm X To his admirers, he was a courageous advocate for the rights of Black Americans, a man who indicted White America in the harshest terms for its crimes against Black Americans. Detractors accused him of preaching racism, black supremacy, and violence. He has been called one of the greatest and most influential Black Americans in history. Malcolm X's father died—killed by white supremacists. Subscribe to I Love Ancestry eNews: eepurl.com/CLJan >>---->

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